Togolese food

When I first came to Togo in 2014 I knew that I would be serving as a Peace Corps Volunteer the following year and I was excited to try the food I would be eating in the time I live here. I have never been a picky eater, but the first thing I ordered in Togo was fufu with goat sauce. Fufu is a staple in the Togolese diet, but it was easily the worst thing I had ever eaten. In the past year I have grown to really enjoy many foods that I found repulsive after I first ate them and even find myself craving fufu. So in a hope to share what Togolese cuisine looks like I have created this blog. There are some foods I refuse to ever eat like dog, but for the most part, I’ll try anything once. These are the foods that are available in my village or my market village, but like other countries the food varies in each village.

This is my favorite street food: egg sandwich with Nescafé mixed with condensed milk.   
This is the fufu process, one starts with a yam which is a long white tuber completely void of nutritional value. It is boiled in a big pot over a fire and then pounded into a dough like consistency. Fufu is always eaten with the right hand and dipped into a sauce. This one is served with a fish sauce.

  
  
Street meat, something I once found questionable, but it’s actually delicious.  

Ayimolou, Togolese rice and beans with spicy sauce and palm oil. Then can be topped with spaghetti, which is a condiment in Togo. This is my favorite rice and bean lady, Dedo who is also in my women’s group. 
So much bread, there’s salt or sugar bread. The only food in Togo that has become more repulsive to me the longer I’ve been here.  
 

Pate, the other staple along with fufu. Made with corn mush and is the consistency of mashed potatoes and eaten with your right hand and dipped into a sauce.  
Piment, spicy peppers ground up and put on everything.  
Grilled or fried plantains   

Soja, fried tofu put into a plastic bag with spicy piment sauce  

There’s also bouille, which is watery corn mush with sugar added and is what everyone here eats for breakfast. I think it’s the consistency of baby vomit, but it just tastes like sugar.

Gâteaux, which translates to mean cake, but don’t be fooled it’s salty dough filled with spaghetti and piment sauce.

Beignets, fried dough made with bean flour (my favorite) or sugary corn flour.

Market sandwich:anchovies, onions, hot peppers, avocado, and spaghetti.

Street salad: lettuce, mayonnaise, and spaghetti. 

  

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